Bus Stop

1956

Comedy / Drama / Romance

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
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February 10, 2019 at 12:33 AM

Director

Cast

as Chérie
as Beauregard 'Bo' Decker
as Virgil Blessing
as Grace
720p.BLURAY 1080p.BLURAY
798.14 MB
1280*720
English
Approved
23.976
01 hr 36 min
P/S 9 / 73
1.51 GB
1920*1080
English
Approved
23.976
01 hr 36 min
P/S 12 / 75

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by BrandtSponseller 10 / 10

In Praise of Don Murray

While I'm in agreement with the consensus view on Bus Stop that it is one of the better films with Marilyn Monroe, and I like Monroe as much as the next classic film fan, or as much as the next guy with overactive hormones, I've noticed a relative downplaying of Don Murray's work in the film--often critics outright dismiss him, characterizing Bus Stop as a film that works "despite Murray's character and performance". I couldn't disagree with that more strongly. Not to detract from Monroe, but what really pushed Bus Stop over the top for me in terms of quality--in addition to the fine, allegorical story--was the hilariously over-the-top performance of Murray and the sheer absurdity of his character.

But maybe my different view on this, and why I love the film so much, is because I'm a huge fan of absurdism. Bus Stop is the tale of Beauregard "Bo" Decker (Murray) and Virgil Blessing (Arthur O'Connell). They're headed from their ranch in Montana to Phoenix, Arizona to participate in a rodeo. Bo is quite skilled at ridin' and rustlin', so Virgil is taking him "off of the farm" for one of the only times in his life to give the rodeo a shot, and more importantly, to get him a bit more worldly experience, especially with women. Bo's experience with the fairer sex had been pretty much limited to pictures in magazines. Virgil seems to just want Bo to lose a bit of his innocence, but Bo has in his mind that he's going to find "an angel" and take possession of her. Because he's only been on a ranch, that's the only way he knows how to relate to anything. He figures once he finds an angel he'll just rope her up like a calf and take her home. As we see from the beginning of the film, Bo has a tendency to be brash and yell at everyone, like he's hollerin' instructions across the range at his partner before they lose control of their cattle.

Enter Monroe as showgirl "Cherie". She's a hillbilly (heck, we learn that she even almost married her cousin) from Arkansas whose made it as far as Arizona, where she's playing a dive girlie club in Phoenix, trying to earn enough money and gumption to one day make it to L.A. Once Bo sees her, he decides she's his angel. Needless to say, that doesn't go over so well.

The bulk of the film consists of Bo trying to ride everything in the world like a bucking bronco while others, including Cherie, try to figure out what's wrong with him. For me, this material was gut-bustingly funny. I had to hit pause on the DVD player a number of times because I was laughing so hard.

This is not to say that Monroe doesn't turn in a great, nuanced performance--she does, despite the reported difficulties filming her. According to scriptwriter George Axelrod, she would repeatedly break out in tears, become extremely frustrated, forget her lines, yell profanities, and director Joshua Logan couldn't call "cut" during her scenes or she'd take it as a personal affront, so Logan would let 900 feet of film just run out while he talked to her, coaxing a performance out of her. And it's not to say that Monroe and Murray do not have chemistry together--they do; if they hadn't, the film wouldn't have worked.

But without Murray's bizarre but funny character, which he plays to a tee, I'm not sure I would have thought Bus Stop was a 10. In fact, there was one section where I felt that score might be in jeopardy--during the latter part of the relatively quiet climax set in Grace's Diner/Bus Stop, when Murray tones down a bit. The film is still good at that point--still definitely a 9, but I found myself slightly missing the hyperactive comedy of the earlier scenes.

The story for Bus Stop was originally a one-act play by William Inge called People in the Wind. Inge later adapted People in the Wind for a larger scale production on Broadway, now retitled Bus Stop. It opened at the Music Box Theater in New York City on March 2, 1955 and ran for 478 performances. It was quickly adapted for film by Axelrod, who changed the play quite a bit, including dropping major characters.

The cinematography in the film is lush, and evidences that we're still in the early days of the anamorphic widescreen process known as Cinemascope. Logan makes use of some broad landscapes and wide shots of the rodeo, crowd and such, but the best uses of widescreen in the film are subtler. Probably the best shot arrives in that "quiet" section mentioned above, when Cherie has her head on Grace's bar, her torso stretched horizontally. Bo ends up putting his head on top of hers, aligning his body similarly, and together they fill the screen, naturally conforming to the aspect ratio. Logan's direction is great throughout, both for camera work and his actor's performances.

As for Monroe, perhaps reflecting (barely) offscreen problems at the time, she easily paints a complex, almost tortured soul. Her performance underscores one of the main subtexts of the film--loneliness accompanied by a kind of melancholy hope. Every character who has more than a couple lines is experiencing this in some way--even Bo, who is covering it up with his boisterousness. Logan and Axelrod also emphasize ironies--one beautiful instance is when Bo announces Cherie as his angel while she's singing "That Old Black Magic" in a very suggestive costume. And there are nice, unrealized (by the characters) parallels in their quests--in their loneliness and hope, they're really all looking for their own angels, often not recognizing when they're right in front of them.

Reviewed by Nazi_Fighter_David 8 / 10

A comedy-drama very well done!

Alternately puzzled, lost, desperate, lonely, confused and unexpectedly radiant with happiness, Marilyn Monroe, with a mixture of humor and pain scores her greatest triumph in Joshua Logan's "Bus Stop" creating a complete and deeply touching character...

Singing 'That Old Black Magic' to a noisy crowd of cowpokes who couldn't care less about her efforts to entertain them, Cherie is pleased to discover a fan in Bo, a young and innocent cowboy who has come to make his fortune at the Rodeo and finds himself an Angel to take back to his Montana ranch...The kiss she gives him in appreciation, determines him then and there to be his beloved wife...

Logan gives Don Murray his first and best-remembered screen role, as the gauche simple-thinking cowboy who romances the glamorous 'chantoose'... Marilyn succeeds in making him say "please" which is the point of the whole thing... Murray was Oscar-nominated for his performance...

There are other fine performances in the movie: Arthur O'Connell, delightful as the cowboy's pal who big-brothers him with loving patience; Eileen Heckart amusing as the old time friend; Betty Field, strong enough as the bus stop owner; Robert Bray, firm as the driver of the bus and Hope Lange, so auspicious in her screen debut whom Cherie reveals details of her past...

With a modern Western background and rodeo atmosphere, and with panoramic long shot and overwhelming close-ups in color and CinemaScope, "Bus Stop" is a comedy-drama very well done, and a modest entertainment in familiar American vein...

The film had one of Monroe's most touching songs: 'That Old Black Magic' was as funny as it was heartbreaking?

Reviewed by abooboo-2 7 / 10

Monroe At Her Best

Marilyn Monroe is so good here it's startling. Her Cherie (with the accent on the first syllable, remember) is one of the most lovable characters in the history of film. That the rest of the movie is rocky-going and her co-star is no match for her is unfortunate, but not fatal.

Apparently the director, Joshua Logan, was able to create a relatively peaceful environment where Monroe could completely "let go" and allow her natural fragility and sex appeal to take over. When she's on screen it's impossible to take your eyes off her, not just because she's beautiful (what starlet from the 1950's WASN'T beautiful?) but because she's laying bare her character's soul for the camera (and in the process much of her own soul as well). She isn't just reading lines with various inflections or doing bits of business like so many actors do, she's bringing the character to life.


Unforgettable is the moment where she finds herself perched on the shoulder of the crazy, lovestruck cowboy watching a parade and she's trying to pantomime to a friend in the crowd how she wound up up there. Or the way she keeps "shushing" the loud-talking bus driver so that he won't wake up the sleeping cowboy as she's planning her escape. Or the way she can't make eye contact or get her lazy backwoods accent (that is incredibly charming) to sound firm enough when she keeps trying to tell the cowboy to get lost. Her comic timing is just sublime and unteachable.

Don Murray's performance as the cowboy, criminally and inexplicably Oscar-nominated, is cloying, two-dimensional and geared for the stage, not the intimacy of film. He needs to provide some hint of vulnerabilty before he's humbled in the fist fight with the bus driver, but he is tragically not up to the task. His Beauregard is the kind of loud-mouthed, uncouth buffoon that only a greatly skilled comic actor can make sympathetic, and Murray simply doesn't know how to finesse the comic moments and make them work.


Monroe receives fine support from Arthur O'Connell as Beau's older, wiser friend Virgil Blessing, but this is her show all the way. She makes it a good movie, but one can't help imagining how much better it could have been had it been directed by someone like Kazan and co-starred possibly Rock Hudson.

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